Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Something is Rotten in the State of Denmark

Democrats, candidates for higher office, economists, and celebrities (Oprah), love Denmark as an example of a high-tax, big government, all-encompassing welfare state that works.  Your friendly proprietor is still waiting for an exodus of these Dane-loving Americans to apply for permanent residence in Denmark.

Having visited Denmark numerous times beginning in 1967, most recently in 2005, I can say that Tivoli Gardens is fun in summer, the old castles and palaces are charming as elsewhere in Europe, and that fresh Danish pastry cannot be surpassed anywhere in the world.  Good beer. Danes are among the top English-speakers in the world--do we expect tourists to speak Danish?  Denmark is a lovely place for a three-day visit, if you can afford it!

But those features are overwhelmed by Denmark's shortcomings.

Pickled fish.
Dreadful food, except for perhaps the three-star $200 lunch.
Cold and dark eight months of the year.
Tiny.  One can get around the entire country within a day.
Boring.
Oppressive taxation.
Unpronounceable language (so say the Norwegians and Swedes).
Weak higher education.

The latter needs some detail.  Higher education may be free for Danes in exchange for high taxes, but what about its quality.  Denmark's highest ranking university, the University of Copenhagen, stands at 82 in the Times Higher Education list of the world's top 100 universities (the only one in the top 100), 69 in the QS World Ranking, 61 in the U.S. News list, and a somewhat better 40 in the Shanghai Jiao Tong list (along with the Aarhus University at 74).

Danes rank high on the list of happiest people in the world.  One person's happiness may be another's quiet resignation.

I am open-minded and flexible in my beliefs, but as a native Missourian, show me!  Please let me know when dozens, okay, I'll settle for 10, prominent leftist Democrats move to Denmark.

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