Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Politics On The Farm (Stanford), November 3, 2020

Several thousand faculty, staff, and students who live in Stanford Campus Housing are registered to vote in Stanford’s exclusive 94305 zip code.  Stanford includes eight precincts.  For reporting purposes, Santa Clara County combines them into two super-precincts.  In the data that follow, I further combine them into one comprehensive result for 94305.

 

Here are the results:

 

                      Biden               Trump          Others

 

Stanford     1,860 (94.7%)    68 (3.5%)    37 (1.8%)

 

California     (65.3%)            (32.9 %)       (1.6%)

 

The most important ballot measure in my view was Proposition 15, which was an attempt to change a key provision in Proposition 13.  Approved in 1976, Proposition 13 taxed all property at 1% of its sales price and limited annual increases in assessments to a maximum of 2% a year.  Proposition 15 would create a split roll by removing commercial and industrial property from the 2% annual limit, replacing it with an assessment based on market value.  This change would amount to an estimated statewide tax increase of between $6-11 billion on commercial and industrial property.  Proposition 15 leaves the annual 2% property tax Increase limit on residential property unchanged .

 

                              Yes                            No

 

Stanford          1,664  (86.4%)          262  (13.4%)

 

California             (48.3%)                   (51.7%)

 

Several brief comments.

 

First, there is barely a twinge of political diversity at Stanford.  There was one Trump vote for every 27 Biden votes.  Blink and you might miss the Trump votes. 

 

Second, Stanford faculty and students are much further left on the political spectrum than the state itself.

 

Third, California voters rejected an increase in property tax assessments on commercial and industrial property, while Stanford faculty, staff, and students voted overwhelmingly for it.

12 comments :

John Keltz said...

Interesting. How did they vote on Prop 16?

Unknown said...

Because, you know...diversity

Unknown said...

Saying there's no political diversity because there are barely any Trump voters is like saying there's no ethnic diversity because there are barely any Melenesians.

Unknown said...

I completely disagree with the conclusion that "Stanford faculty and students are much further left on the political spectrum than the state itself."
Regardless of anyone's political inclinations - Donald Trump is simply beyond the pale.

I will quote a BBC reporter's summation this morning based on Trump's Press Conference last night, "Donald Trump does not want to be a 1-term President and he is willing to rubbish America's democratic reputation to hold on. But it's the states in charge of counting the votes and that process continues methodically no matter what the President says."

Stanford faculty & staff are simply reflecting that they are higher by any reasonable measurement of acuity than the average Californian (Bear, Bruin, and especially Trojan).

Unknown said...

Saying there's no political diversity because there are barely any Trump voters is like saying there's no ethnic diversity because there are barely any Melenesians.

If Melanesians were 32% of the population, as Trump voters were in California, that would be a reasonable criticism.

Tom Grey said...

I think it's "illegal" to discriminate against hiring Republicans.

Stanford, and most colleges, have long been discriminating against Republicans. I'd guess the votes in 2012 for Romney were not much more, bud didn't follow.

The polarization in America is driven by HEE (highly educated elite) folk who secretly, or not, discriminate against Reps.

This long term discrimination has, starting with Bush Derangement Syndrome, become demonization.

I now believe most US colleges are doing more social and cultural character damage to America than they are improving the knowledge of the students.

gb said...

Ever heard of the Hoover Institute? Or Scott Atlas? There's plenty of diversity, but Trump is a dictator responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and Stanford students/faculty tend to have the discernment to see that

gb said...

And btw Trump is also really, really dumb. He has no business running a country (which he doesn't anyway)

Unknown said...

"If Melanesians were 32% of the population, as Trump voters were in California, that would be a reasonable criticism."

Representativeness ≠ diversity, which was my initial point.

Jeff Walden said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jeff Walden said...

I'm not sure which are the two precincts mentioned in the post, so I can't answer the first comment's question. It looks like the good professor's numbers may have been preliminary counts, before voting counts hit 100%? So I can't use the official numbers to reverse-engineer which are the relevant precincts.

But https://results.enr.clarityelections.com/CA/Santa_Clara/106043/web.264614/#/detail/90 seems to indicate -- if I merely guess at which are the two precincts in question -- that Proposition 16 received significantly more "No" votes at Stanford than it did votes for Trump.

Precinct 0002542 (the one that seems pretty sure to be one of the two) is at 317 No, 815 Yes. I'm not sure which of precincts 0002545 (just south of 0002542) or 0002002 (just north of 0002542) is the other one. 0002545 is at 385 No, 1201 Yes. 0002002 is at 688 No, 1153 Yes. Either way, you're looking at Stanford voting No/Yes at roughly a 1:2 or 1:3 ratio, not the 1:27 ratio for Trump/Biden.

muddybuddy said...

I concur with some of the views that Trump is such an aberration, and a distasteful one at that, that the lack of votes in his favor from a young, passionate and intelligent population can hardly be mistaken for lack of diversity. We can acknowledge that we have not fully deciphered the broader appeal of Trump without demanding “diversity”. Would we take a similar stance in regimes throughout the world ?